Silver Table Dinner Fork
Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork Silver Table Dinner Fork

Silver Table Dinner Fork, Scottish Provincial, James Erskine Aberdeen c.1800

£175.00

Scottish provincial silver table dinner fork by James Erskine of Aberdeem, c.1800.

Initialed very lightly to back of each terminal.

Marks are { 3turrets,E,hand with dagger}.

Measures 197mm in length.

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Description

Silver Table Dinner Fork

Scottish provincial silver table dinner fork by James Erskine of Aberdeem, c.1800.

Initialled very lightly to the back of each terminal.

Marks are { 3 turrets, E, hand with dagger}.

Measures 197 mm in length.

DATEc.1800
MAKER or SPONSOR MARKJames Erskine
ASSAY OFFICEAberdeen
WEIGHT (Grammes)65
WEIGHT (Troy)2.09
REF:-29V1-29V5

The production of silverware in Scotland probably pre-dates even than that in England. The Guild of Silversmiths is mentioned in a legal document which dates from the 1460s during the reign of Jacob II of Scotland. Towards the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century in Scotland, only the maker’s mark was used on silverware.  It was sometimes used alongside the mark of the town of production.

Although there were Assay offices in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Aberdeen did not have an office of its own.  Edinburgh being the sole remaining office in Scotland today.

Fork comes from the Latin furca or pitchfork. The fork is a utensil now often made of stainless steel but previously of silver. Simply described, the long handle terminates in a head that branches into several narrow and often slightly curved tines with which one spears food.

Additional information

Origin

Scottish

Period

George III 1760-1820

Sponsor/Maker

James Erskine

REF CODE

29V1-29V5

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